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About this blog

I like history and I like weather. I really like weather that makes history. Hopefully making an effort to share will lead me to discover and learn more in these areas.

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Chantilly 1862

Chantilly 1862

On September 1, 1862 the Batlle of Ox Hill at Chantilly was fought during severe thunderstorms. It was one of the only battles of the Civil War known to be fought under stormy weather conditions. While our military troops currently view adverse weather and low visiblity environments to be advantageous, this was not the case for troops in the Civil War era. Military tactics at this time favored engagements between large numbers of troops, and so stealth was not usually a primary concern. Combat d

1816

1816

Great Colonial Hurricane 1635

Great Colonial Hurricane 1635

On August 25, 1635 the colonies in New England were struck by what was one of the strongest hurricanes ever to make landfall in New England. It is quite possible that it is the strongest hurricane to hit that far north, period. It is generally considered to be the first hurricane to actually be recorded in North America. Surprisingly, there are numerous detailed accounts of this event that survived and give us a glimpse at the early colonists’ first encounter with an historic east coast hurrican

1816

1816

Camille 1969

Camille 1969

On August 18, 1969 the second most intense hurricane that has been recorded striking the U.S. came ashore on the Mississippi coast. The only hurricane known to have made landfall with a lower atmospheric pressure than Camille was strong enough to literally sandblast people into non existence.  The Labor Day hurricane that resides in 1st place on the list of most intense hurricanes is a source of endless fascination as well as nightmares for me. Camille may not have caused as many fatalities as t

1816

1816

Lynmouth 1952

Lynmouth 1952

On August 15, 1952 an extremely heavy rain event caused a deadly flood in the village of Lynmouth on the southern coast of England. The first two weeks of August had already been extremely wet in this area, meaning that when the storm arrived the ground was already completely saturated.  A low pressure system in the Atlantic was caught up by the upper air pattern and carried towards England, where it interacted with a cold front to produce many inches of rain in a short period of time. The previ

1816

1816

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