Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Spring Fever Spreading

Will Spring be on time for your region? Join the Conversation >> Long Range Spring Outlook

Sign in to follow this  

Dying Oak Tree | Update

Solstice

285

Old Post:

Spoiler

These are old photos, but this is the second oak I've noticed where one side dies with a bunch of small holes at breast height on the trunk. Quite peculiar. Anyone have any clue what this is? Respond in the comments.

20180607_190634_HDR.thumb.jpg.5831567b9d47212f63f10ac5225134a4.jpg20180607_190656.thumb.jpg.3beebc41c8bcb4c28e1668612ae0e42d.jpg

 

Update:

Here's an update on the dying oak tree. It's not a good one. The tree appears to be under severe stress and now the other trunk is in a sad state of affairs. While walking around I noticed a singular mushroom ~5 feet from the trunk.

20180819_134312_HDR.thumb.jpg.e14af5853e8b691e041be2992e451763.jpg

 

The amount of sunlight coming down has allowed a couple of grasses to start growing. I suspect the ultimate demise should come shortly.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1


10 Comments


Recommended Comments

Here’s a fact sheet from Penn State that may shed some light,

https://extension.psu.edu/oak-diseases

I'm curious as to why you intend to speed up its demise by girdling it? (If it has one of the fatal diseases as per the the linked article and other oaks are in the area, total removal my be best.)

Good luck!

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
4 hours ago, Hiramite said:

'm curious as to why you intend to speed up its demise by girdling it? (If it has one of the fatal diseases as per the the linked article and other oaks are in the area, total removal my be best.)

 

Ehhh wasn't really thinking when I wrote that. I hope it isn't a "contagious" disease because that area is surrounded by oaks...

 

Will read that article when I have time! Thanks!

Share this comment


Link to comment
On 9/19/2018 at 8:06 PM, Hiramite said:

Any update on the oaks?  Figure out what is was?

100% dead now. Still not able to identify what it was. Now that they are dead, I guess I can peel back the bark without any additional harm. 

Too many holes opening up in the forest canopy. Halloween 2011 Nor'easter (I think 3 trees?), Hurricane Sandy (28 trees, including a 32" diameter red oak), March Nor'easter 2018 (permanent stunting damage to the majority of saplings), the thunderstorm a few weeks back... now add these strange diseases into the mix, affecting oak and ash. Used to not be able to see any house from around due to the massive amounts of leaves... now it's all open. :classic_sad:.

  • Sad 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
17 minutes ago, Solstice said:

100% dead now. Still not able to identify what it was. Now that they are dead, I guess I can peel back the bark without any additional harm. 

Too many holes opening up in the forest canopy. Halloween 2011 Nor'easter (I think 3 trees?), Hurricane Sandy (28 trees, including a 32" diameter red oak), March Nor'easter 2018 (permanent stunting damage to the majority of saplings), the thunderstorm a few weeks back... now add these strange diseases into the mix, affecting oak and ash. Used to not be able to see any house from around due to the massive amounts of leaves... now it's all open. :classic_sad:.

Bummer on both accounts.  I lost a few trees last Nov in a microburst including a red oak that was about 3’ diam (never measured it). It was one of the few trees that still had leaves when the high (60-70mph) winds hit.  I never would have believed a healthy tree that big could blow over.

Anyway, look on the bright side. Change is the one constant in the woods. Openings create new food sources for the critters and opportunities for new trees to sprout. 

And speaking of diseases, a new one popped up here in NE OH that is killing the beeches. :classic_angry:

  • Sad 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
Just now, Hiramite said:

Bummer on both accounts.  I lost a few trees last Nov in a microburst including a red oak that was about 3’ diam (never measured it). It was one of the few trees that still had leaves when the high (60-70mph) winds hit.  I never would have believed a healthy tree that big could blow over.

Anyway, look on the bright side. Change is the one constant in the woods. Openings create new food sources for the critters and opportunities for new trees to sprout. 

And speaking of diseases, a new one popped up here in NE OH that is killing the beeches. :classic_angry:

 

Speaking of new trees, this pine popped up out of nowhere! Not 100% sure if it's an Eastern White Pine, but it looks like it. Strange thing is I've never had one here in a decade. :classic_blink:.

 

Share this comment


Link to comment
12 minutes ago, Solstice said:

 

Speaking of new trees, this pine popped up out of nowhere! Not 100% sure if it's an Eastern White Pine, but it looks like it. Strange thing is I've never had one here in a decade. :classic_blink:.

 

Kind of looks like one. They’re pretty common around here. If it is, it should have bundles of 5 needles, one for each letter in the word “white”. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi,

I looked around and Uconn only had this one page on oak wilt: Oak Wilt: A Threat to Our Oak Trees

At Cornell there was more. If you can find any branches from the oaks whittle the bark off and see if it looks like this if they do it's a good bet your oaks have the wilt, but check the pictures of the leaves and bark also in the links I provided:

image.png.6f81dc1262641c5148d5078c6f3b72a4.png

Source: New York Invasive Species Information 2018   This is the clogging of the sapwood xylem caused by the fungus, the page also has other pictures of symptoms.

The majority of NY hasn't been hit with wilt but Long Island been hit hard:

image.png.5f3473cd4336509ebb3296edee7c77e2.png

Source: Oak wilt found in six new New York locations The fungus is spread by infected Bark beetles and through a natural occurrence of root systems called grafting where the trees share water, nutrients, and unfortunately the fungus. The beetles bore into the trees and I believe I saw pictures of holes in your gallery shots of the trees.

Looking to the left panel of this page: Oak Wilt Analysis The Cornell Plant Disease Diagnostic Clinic (PDDC), near the bottom is a youtube link that explains oak wilt and as always there are a few more videos in the right column. Check out the postcard link above the youtube link it shows more symptoms.

I wish I had better news for you.

Share this comment


Link to comment
On 9/21/2018 at 9:42 PM, Hiramite said:

Bummer on both accounts.  I lost a few trees last Nov in a microburst including a red oak that was about 3’ diam (never measured it). It was one of the few trees that still had leaves when the high (60-70mph) winds hit.  I never would have believed a healthy tree that big could blow over.

Anyway, look on the bright side. Change is the one constant in the woods. Openings create new food sources for the critters and opportunities for new trees to sprout. 

And speaking of diseases, a new one popped up here in NE OH that is killing the beeches. :classic_angry:

Not to hijack your blog, but I finally measured the oak tree that blew over last fall, 30” diameter.

Here’s a pic, root ball is about 13-15’ high.

 

1F550230-97BE-41C5-93C6-377C8402C261.jpeg

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×