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Cignus

USGS: 2 small earthquakes recorded in Pennsylvania

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Wyomissing area residents felt the effects Wednesday morning, when authorities received calls between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m. reporting shaking and “loud booms.”

Parts of Berks County shaken by minor earthquake Wednesday morning

1.9 mag. - 1km WSW of Shillington, Pennsylvania  2018-09-12 03:49:35 (UTC-04:00)  - 3.0 km deep

1.7 mag. - 3km WSW of Flying Hills, Pennsylvania 2018-09-12 05:48:51 (UTC-04:00) -  2.0 km deep

USGS: 2 small earthquakes recorded in Pennsylvania

Scientists: 2 small earthquakes recorded in Pennsylvania

I also have a map of the quake area that I forgot to post :classic_blush: in my OP the source is the USGS link:

EQ.PNG.fbb16133bf38260f76212a343614ec76.PNG

Edited by Cignus
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Wyomissing Hills is where residents have been hearing loud bangs, earth shaking the past several weeks. Tons of rain in that area this summer. Scary stuff!

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That's right, didn't that area  have around 6 to 7" of rain and Manheim had what? 9"?

I remember a small quake a few years ago, it was the August 23rd 2011 Virginia quake; I was outside gardening when something didn't feel right, then I had the sensation of rising up and down like a rolling motion. I went inside and asked my wife if she felt anything and she felt the rolling motion to.

There wasn't any noise or booms just an eerie stillness, silence.

 

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1 hour ago, Cignus said:

That's right, didn't that area  have around 6 to 7" of rain and Manheim had what? 9"?

I remember a small quake a few years ago, it was the August 23rd 2011 Virginia quake; I was outside gardening when something didn't feel right, then I had the sensation of rising up and down like a rolling motion. I went inside and asked my wife if she felt anything and she felt the rolling motion to.

There wasn't any noise or booms just an eerie stillness, silence.

 

Yep! I'm in Manheim, we've had several big rains here this summer. The last one, 2 weekends ago, was officially 9 or 10, I believe. I have to question that, because when we were taking out the trash that Sunday night, we measured 18" of water in the one recycle can which was definitely empty 6 days prior! We had a few downpours during the days leading up to the Friday soaker, so there may have been a few inches in there, but I think we got more than 10" during those hours on Friday. It was torrential rain hour after hour, it never let up.

I recall an earthquake on Easter Sunday back in the early 80's, I think. I lived in East Petersburg at the time, was upstairs watching tv, and the bed just sort of rocked and rolled. Found out we were fairly close to a fault line there, which might explain why we found so many fossils in the adjacent fields!! 🙄

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That was a couple of weeks that upper Lancaster and lower Lebanon counties were getting hammered. Even though the official station has their report on precip it's always more or less in OBY (one's back yard). Down this way it seemed like every other day there was warnings or watches for the Swatara creek, we had one downpour that dropped 1.5" in about 20" then fell apart headin' in to Hbg..

If you ever take notice of the curvature of the Appalachian mountains going through central PA they form a curved lowland from the eastern seaboard that turn into the foothills of the Appalachians. This area is known as the Martinsburg Formation (Upper Ordovician), do a search for PA Fossils from the Martinsburg Formation (Upper Ordovician) and you'll see a lot of .pdf papers on the how and why this formation has a lot of fossils.

And, it doesn't surprise me that our area is ripe for the smaller type earthquakes with the mid-Atlantic ridge spreading and applying pressure on the continent. The red circle is our general area and the yellow arrows is the pressure being applied by the mid-Atlantic ridge. I'm just thankful they are "small" quakes.

use.PNG.aa304d789928687e4c4fc862491a49ed.PNG

 

Check my OP I have a map of the quake area that I forgot to post :classic_blush: in my OP the source is the USGS link.

 

 

Edited by Cignus
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