Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Spring Fever Spreading

Will Spring be on time for your region? Join the Conversation >> Long Range Spring Outlook

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'hugger'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • North East | Mid Atlantic
  • Ohio Valley | Great Lakes
  • Mid West | Upper MidWest | Plains | Upper Mississippi Valley
  • SouthEast | Tennessee Valley | Lower Mississippi Valley
  • Intermountain West | Front Range
  • Pacific NorthWest
  • West Coast
  • Great Lakes | St Lawrence Lowlands
  • Tropics - Atlantic Basin
  • Tropics - Pacific Basin
  • Active Weather
  • Space
  • Announcements
  • WXD News
  • Maintenance

Categories

  • Basic Meteorology
  • Severe Weather
  • Tropical Systems
  • Winter Systems
  • Teleconnections
  • Clouds
  • Weather Classroom
    • Online Media | Tools | Links
    • Print Media & Books
    • Educational
    • Glossary

Blogs

  • Wx Wiinii
  • The Forest
  • Going Organic
  • Long Island Weather
  • Let's Remember This
  • Quotes from the Old Forums
  • OSNW3 | WxClimate
  • Here`s Tuesday - August 28, 2018`s Historical Climate Summary for Bemis, TN !
  • TDAT's Area of Thoughts, Analysis, and Prediction
  • Mark0x01
  • Winter - first ever attempt to do this thang
  • idee ..."weather ideas"...idées météo...vær ideer...väderidéer
  • Storm results compared to Models
  • Seasonal lag
  • Quotes from the WxDisco Forums

WXD Boards

  • Active Weather
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Tropics
  • Meteo Discussion
    • Long Range Forecasts
    • Historical Weather
    • Personal Weather
    • Weather Q & A
    • Weather Bits
  • Mama Nature
    • Space Sciences
    • Natures Wrath
    • Atmosphere and Climate
    • The Oceans
  • Off Topic
    • Chit Chat
    • Entertainment
  • Resources
    • Weather Tools and Gadgets
    • The Testing Ground
  • WXD Info | Support
    • Staff Announcements
    • Site Usage

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Locale


Interests


Perfect Day

Found 7 results

  1. PREFACE Hello, posters and lurkers! This thread opener will not be a very laborious one. Perhaps because the weather has been so ingrate, it does not deserve a traditional thread opener. This time frame may give the region some kind of storm to entertain us courtesy of the same usually players; an active southern stream with its moisture riches and the northern stream. But this time, we have a very illustrious player; the polar vortex. There are some indications that since the polar vortex will from time to time relax its grip over the region, a storm could take the opportunity to affect the region, using the polar vortex as some kind of blocking mechanism to spare us a Great Lakes cutter. From the observations I have been making for the last two days, it seems that the first period that the polar vortex will relax some over the region will be during the time frame for this thread. With so much energy crossing the continental US and that unrelenting southern stream branch, perhaps the presence of the polar vortex during a reloading period is what is needed to make a storm come together for the region in a way most could benefit. Now, talking guidance wise, there are some hints here and there both on the operational and ensemble sides. Please see them below, most should be subtle, though. EPS CONTROL 12Z Jan 23rd 00Z Jan 24th 12Z Jan 24th 00Z Jan 25th 00Z FV3 06Z FV3 [Given the chaotic state of the atmosphere over the CONUS, the thread dates will likely need to be adjusted later on closer to whatever event comes].
  2. PREFACE Getting past the January 20th time frame and storm, there are indications that a cold air invasion is becoming more and more apparent for the eastern CONUS as we fast approach the last 10 days of January. With that in mind and considering that the southern stream over the CONUS should continue to be actively keeping the GOMEX rich moisture content available to be lifted and gathered for storm formation, I see a rather good opportunity for a storm to impact the region, which would include the Mid-Atlantic and even New England depending on how amplified the storm becomes. For a more amplified storm to come to be, we need a solid set of teleconnections (AO, EPO, NAO, and PNA) and the development of Greenland into North Pole blocking, or at least a Greenland block. Given the actual data available from the EPS 46 days and EPS products, the January 24-26 time frame, would benefit from a mostly solid teleconnection package and perhaps the advent of a Greenland into North Pole blocking. The blocking though, may not be totally established yet during this time frame, but by the end of January, it could be the big boss in town. Long range operational model signals do exist for a storm in this time frame, but as I usually do, I try to avoid using the operational model storm signals for possibilities that are in the 12 to 16 days in the future time frame for the thread openers, instead relying on the ensemble guidance signals or other longer range weekly or monthly models. Given that some operational models present "forecasts" or outputs for 15 to 16 days out, I use that range as my limit to consider opening a storm thread, to avoid turning the thread into a long-range pattern discussion thread. Overall Set up Continued southern stream activity with ample GOMEX moisture to be tapped and lifted along with deeper cold air presence perhaps with a high-pressure presence and CAD development. Teleconnection robust package, possible initial developing stages of Greenland blocking, aiding in a more teemed northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Track-wise, we could have one of the 3 most traditional tracks, the western/central PA cutter track, the northern Mid-Atlantic tucked to the coast track and the beloved benchmark track. Which track would be the verified one come the time frame, would be determined in good part by the depth of the cold air in place, blocking high-pressure placement, possible phasing time, if one ever comes to be, and interestingly enough, whatever influence the initial development stages of the Greenland block would have on this time frame, if any at all. Most of these mentioned can certainly be a result of how strong the teleconnection package for this time frame is. Below, an image showing the 3 possible storm tracks can be seen. Storm Track Visual Aid Before we move on the next page, on which you will be able to see the forecasted EPS North American and Northern Hemisphere setup, the EPS 46-days teleconnections and EPS precipitation output for this time frame, I would like to finish this page, with a couple of EPS control runs images and an very interesting, perhaps surprising to some, seasonal CFS MSLP output for this time frame. CFS Surface Pressure It´s very intriguing or interesting to me at least, that very robust storm would be shown on the CFS at such a time range, near the time frame that this thread discusses. It´s a neat piece of information or perhaps, let´s say evidence. Jan 9th, 2019 12Z EPS CONTROL (tucked and benchmark track hybrid) Jan 10th, 2019 00Z EPS CONTROL (western PA track hybrid) On the next page, you will see additional data related to this time frame. To start off this page, please see the Northern Hemisphere and North America set up for the time frame in discussion. January 7th, 2019, 00Z EPS 46 day Northern Hemisphere North America There´s no way to look at this setup and be indifferent to it. That argues for a real winter over the eastern CONUS. We can see the lower heights over northern Canada connect to the lower heights over the SE CONUS, setting up a deep negatively oriented trough over eastern North America, and the developing Greenland block. All that if were to verify, would translate to a much colder eastern United States and a much more promising storm track from the southeast to northeast CONUS with the less progressive component courtesy of the Greenland blocking. As we continue, you can see below the EPS 24-hour precipitation for the time frame in discussion. Jan 9th, 2019 12Z Jan 10th, 2019 00Z And now the EPS 46-days teleconnections (AO, EPO, NAO, and PNA) AO EPO There is not much to argue concerning this EPS AO/EPO combo as it relates to the time frame. Both teleconnections are in their negative state, which is primordial for the availability of a strong and more sustained cold air presence over the eastern CONUS. The -AO is around -1.5 to -1.7 while the -EPO is around -1.3 to -1.5, which is the most negative it has been in recent weeks. We like this. NAO PNA This combo, the way I interpret it, looks very promising and supportive of a storm track that could deliver the wintry goods and be more amplified, and perhaps not so quick to exit the region. The -NAO can lay a hand in allowing blocking conditions over the eastern areas of North America while the +PNA would argue for a ridge over the western US and depending on how it interacts with the -EPO aforementioned, a deeper colder trough could pass through the eastern US. Notice that the -PNA is in positive to negative trajectory during the time frame in discussion, and flips to negative sometime around January 28th. That changing magnitude could play a positive role in the flow pattern. Given the data, this time frame looks like it has more robust aspects to it to allow the region to at least have a better shot at a wintry storm that may impact areas that are snowless since November, What do you guys think? Does this one have a standing chance? Or is it another dream only reality? Later! UPDATES: Jan 11th, 2018 January 10th, 2019, 00Z EPS 46 day Northern Hemisphere North America January 10th, 2019, 00Z EPS 46 day AO EPO This combo has suffered a blow and is weaker now as compared to the January 7th run. The -AO continues pretty solid. However, the EPO has changed to neutral to slightly negative. Before on the 7th of January, it was decently in a negative state. NAO PNA This combo also has suffered from changes. Although the NAO continues to be negative, it is not as negative as compared to the output from the January 7th run. As for the PNA, it went from a more solid positive state to a slightly positive state, basically neutral and flat. We will see how this evolves on the next update scheduled to occur on January 14th, 2019.
  3. Overall Setup Continued active southern stream branch, with conflicting teleconnections signals and active robust BSR signal. Northern stream still sending energy impulses eastward. As always timing between the northern and southern branches can greatly influence the outcome of this possibility but does not necessarily mean that only a phased solution is required as depending on the track of the southern stream energy, in case it´s more eastward, this time frame seems colder. BSR Depiction A low-pressure system developing over the northeastern GOMEX and southern SE CONUS, tracks ENE'ward towards the southeast coastal waters and the northeastward towards the Mid -Atlantic coastal waters. Once it´s offshore near the coast of Virginia, the storm tracks either to the ENE affecting only the Mid-Atlantic including near coastal areas of the northern Mid Atlantic and southern New England or actually continues on towards the Gulf of Maine and also impacts northern New England. Now, the BSR is showing what it seems to be two different potential storms in the time frame between Jan 13th and 15th. However, so far it does not seem that there are signals for two storms in this time frame on the models. It may take a bit more time for us to identify exactly which one would be the storm that comes to reality in this time frame for the region, the one that occurs on the 13th or the one on the 15th. Both take similar tracks from the southern southeast CONUS to Virginia and the off the coast. From there, the tracks diverge, as one tracks offshore to the ENE and the other tracks NE towards southern New England. Please see below the possibilities depicted by the BSR. 13th: 15th: 500mb Flow (Jan13th through 15th) The 500mb flow is pretty interesting and does indicate that a storm is possible, although not a too powerful one, especially because we do have conflicting teleconnections during this time frame. On the next page, more relevant and related data can be found, including the teleconnection readings for this time frame. Northern Hemisphere and North American views EPS 500mb height and MSLP: EPS North America flow 500mb height EPS North America Normalized MSLP Overall, not a classic flow, but also not a terrible one. There´s room for a decent storm, while also one cannot disregard the possibility of a farther offshore outcome, in which no one north of eastern Virginia would be impacted. Teleconnections EPS: AO is negative, around -1 while the EPO is in a weak positive state near neutral. This is not a terrible combo as it is, but it´s not ideal as well, given the positive EPO even though is almost in a neutral state. The NAO is transitioning from a near weak positive neutral state to a weak negative one, while the PNA looks to looks to be positive around 1. This combo, although not ideal because of the weak magnitude of the negative NAO flip, nevertheless still have the flipping NAO which is beneficial as well as the positive PNA. As we go on and take a look at the GEFS teleconnections forecast, we see a bit of a different look. GEFS This GEFS AO/EPO combo does look pretty decent, as we have a negative AO around -2 and a negative EPO around -0.5. In case the EPO was in a strong negative state, this would basically be a good one. As we take a look at the NAO/PNA combo, we can argue that this one is pretty decent. The NAO is negative around -0.5 and the PNA is positive around 0.7. The magnitude of the readings is not ideal as both are in weak states, but the signs of polarities for each are good. In short, this one looks to have a good potential to bring wintry precipitation for the thread´s region, also keeping in mind that this does not mean that the whole region will see wintry precipitation. The exact track and storm strength will be determined later. The other aspect to keep in mind is that there´s a chance that whatever storm comes, it could take a further offshore track and not affect areas north of Virginia. Let´s see how it goes folks. Hopefully, it´s time to be rewarded for the snowless December. Have fun!
  4. Preface Hello, posters and lurkers! Perhaps this thread will inject some optimism in us all and cheer your souls up a bit as I believe we have a decent shot at getting the first real winter storm of the now, official winter season 2018/19. What has intrigued me and helped me make up my mind was the impressive BSR data for this time frame, as so far there has been no operational model support for this time frame which is about 18 days away. Overall Setup Simply put, as we have seen so far this season many times, the southern stream should be continuing to do its dirty and beneficial work, keeping energy running near the GOMEX to be tapped or let´s say, excited. Meanwhile, the northern stream may be doing some work across the US central plains, and as a result, may be attractive enough to excite the southern stream to perhaps accept to dance a very classical tango. In addition to that, I expect some sort of high-pressure complex to be floating around from north of the central Great Lakes to northeast of Maine, perhaps bridging with the north-central Atlantic ridge and considering that this will be early January, this high-pressure complex should be more robust millibars wise. In short, these players would need to form a smooth orchestra, to translate the BSR depiction into a cold wintry storm. But in case the orchestra fails to be fine-tuned, then the BSR can still verify, but deliver liquid H20 instead. Moving along, please see below the BSR depiction for this time frame; both 500 mb and surface. It´s pretty impressive and should serve as a real good test of this marvelous forecasting tool. Bearing Sea Rule Surface 500mb This BSR depiction is highly impressive by itself. And if it did not depend on anything else, especially the teleconnections, one could say that a big and powerful storm is coming. But since the weather does not work like this, we will need to take a look at the teleconnections and see if this BSR depiction has an even better chance of actually coming to fruition. Next, let´s go check on some teleconnections. Below, we can take a look at the Dec 17, 20018 00Z EPS 46 days AO, EPO, NAO, and PNA. AO EPO NAO PNA As one interprets the data above, we see: AO = ~ 0.3 negative (supportive) EPO = ~ 0.7 positive (not supportive) [However, not as positive as many instances during the last few weeks] NAO = ~ 0.3-0.2 negative, approaching neutrality (supportive) PNA = ~ 0.3 positive, having just flipped from negative to positive (supportive) All in all, there is teleconnection support for the BSR. The weakened state of the positive EPO should technically prevent a flood of warmer air. Therefore, allow for the presence of cold air to some degree. The highlight then is the flipping negative PNA to a positive PNA and the weaker positive EPO. Let´s see how this one turns out to be. As the days passe, and more data becomes available, I will be updating this thread opener with more information to give support to the BSR for this time frame, and enrich the depth of the thread. Hope to see some good ideas and discussions in here from all of you.
  5. Introduction & Overall setup Hello everyone! By the time the possible event for this thread arrives, the region may have gone through the rains of a couple of Great Lakes cutter storms, or least warmer storms. As a result, some of you may be thinking to yourselves, where is the sleet. the snow? This thread is the platform to be used as an attempt to foment discussion, with the hope that answers, tracking, and analysis may lay credence to the possibility of a storm evolving and affecting the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions, perhaps with wintry precipitation. On this thread´s opener post, we will take a look at a plethora of data in the form of images, that indicate, or at least hint at the possibility of a storm developing for the region. The data will be used as support to give weight to the thread and its idea as well as act as a foundation to the exchange of ideas and points of view on how this event may unfold. As is customary, the data presented my directly or indirectly support the envisioned weather event. For the last 4 days or so, observations made on many different sources of information, such as teleconnections, BSR, EPS Control MSLP output, EPS Mean H5 anomaly, EPS Mean 24-hour precipitation, CPC 8-14 day outlook, precipitation analogs, and many different NCEP GEFS and ESRL/PSD output, were very informative and as a result, led to this thread as a way to promote debate on this possible event. An overall look at the aforementioned data listed in the previous paragraph led me to formulate the illustration below as a mere description of this possible weather event. Please continue on to the next pages to see many different data observed for this event. BSR Depiction Surface representation signal does not look not that impressive. H5 signal is somewhat more promising. Surface: H5: NCEP Ensemble Mean outputs Looking at the images below, it´s possible to interpret that some kind of a progressive to a somewhat deeper storm may arise. MSLP / 1000-500mb THK North America 500mb Northern Hemisphere 500mb Precipitation location aspect and 850mb temperatures give us some hint that moisture could be available together with colder H85 temperatures. Precipitation & Standard Deviation 850mb Temperature Anomaly 850mb Normalized Anomaly ESRL/PSD products outputs: A different perspective given by the PSD outputs. But the same idea though, a possibility of a progressive to a somewhat deeper storm. SLP/1000-500mb thickness North America H5 heights Same idea as well, possible moisture available along with colder 850mb temperatures. 850MB Temperature Anomaly Precipitation, Mean & Standard Deviation Teleconnections: Teleconnection signals, for the most part, appear to be indicative of the idea of a progressive storm given unfavorable negative PNA state. However, given the transitioning state of some of the teleconnections more or less during this time frame, one could not throw out a somewhat more robust storm. Please see below ESRL/PSD, GEFS and EPS 46 days representations: ESRL/PSD GEFS: EPS: Precipitation Analogs & CPC Outlook Taking a look at the data below, one could see that some sort of storminess should be impacting the region as the precipitation analogs and CPC outlook suggest moisture availability in the region. Deterministic Precipitation GEFS Raw Ensemble Mean CPC 8-14 day Precipitation Outlook Interesting EPS Control MSLP runs: There have been many different runs over the last few days that hint at the possibility of a storm around this time frame, give or take a day or two. Please, we can see some of the most interesting ones. 12Z Nov 23, 2018 00Z Nov 24, 2018 12z Nov 24, 2018 12Z Nov 24, 2018 12Z Nov 25, 2018 As we know, nothing is etched in stone when it comes to the weather and the atmosphere. However, that is exactly what drives us to keep the faith that nice storms will come and go to satisfy our needs for excitement, snow and rain to replenish the reservoirs and simply to allow us to continue enjoying our favorite hobby or even profession. So, let the DISCO begin, and who knows we may be able to answer the question; Wintry Weather Returns? Have fun tracking and learning!
  6. Hello, posters and lurkers! It seems that we could get another storm for the east coast before November 2018 is out. Overall main players are the continued active southern stream branch, GOMEX, and SW Atlantic moisture, possible northern stream branch involvement, and the usual presence or lack of High-pressure system over SE Canada acting as the source of cold air, and even possibly blocking the conditions. Basic setup - the low-pressure system should start to develop and gather moisture over the GOMEX and then track over eastern parts of the SE CONUS or track over Florida and then NE or ENE towards the higher latitudes to eastern Maine or southeast Canada. Details such as high-pressure location, northern stream interaction and depth of cold air or lack thereof, will need to be ironed out little by little as this time frame draws near. Please see below an image illustrating the basic setup for this possible storm. Now, onwards to the support data; EPS Control MSLP, BSR and GFS, GEFS, ECMWF and EPS teleconnections (AO, NAO, PNA and EPO) Model Guidance 12Z EPS Control MSLP - 11/12/18 00Z EPS Control MSLP - 11/13/18 Bearing Sea Rule 11/23/18 12Z through 11/27/18 00Z : Teleconnections: GFS AO, NAO, EPO, and PNA, respectively: GEFS - AO and NAO; only these were available at the time of this post creation) ECMWF Teleconection info: (Data from weathermodels.com) AO - ~ -3.3 trending positive NAO - ~ -2.9 stable EPO - ~ +1.3 trending negative PNA - ~ -0.5 slow trend positive EPS Teleconection info: (Data from weathermodels.com) AO - ~ -2.7 stable NAO - ~ -1.4 stable EPO - ~ -0.2 slow trend negative PNA - ~ +1.5 slow trend positive All in all, given the EPS control signal, BSR support for a nearby storm and most of the teleconnections in a favorable status, it seems that the odds for an east coast storm are decent, be it over land east of the Appalachians or just offshore. We will see how all this will evolve, and when the time comes, if there will actually be a storm and where it will track. Have fun discussion!
  7. Hello posters and lurkers; Recently, the Mid Atlantic and Northeast CONUS regions have been influenced by a rather stormy pattern, with consective FROPAs passing through the region and still progged to pass through. These FROPAs bring along with them trofs to the region as the cold fronts depart, and these same trofs can allow for storms to form and affect the region, either as coastal storms, coastal huggers, inland runners, etc. Each trof that swings by the region, therefore, helps to cool down the atmosphere and the surface with the cooler and colder air that accompany them. and as a direct result, progressively increase the snow fall cover over SE Canada and nothern areas of upstate NY and New England, especially over the higher terrain. This evolution of the colder cycle of the northern hemisphere in this almost middle aged fall season, continues to deepen as each day goes by and winter grows nearer. Having this in mind, the time frame for this thread, looks like it could bring a storm, some kind of a storm, that may actually leave its mark on the autumn. Given the interpretation of what the ECMWF deterministic and EPS forecst teleconnections show, along with some foggy BSR support and EPS Emsemble Control MSLP output, one could argue for 2 possible storm scenarios for this time frame; cyclogenesis occuring near the US east coast from a piece of energy just offshore from the southeast coast, as the developing storm tracks N and/or NNE rouding the western periphery of the northern Atlantic ocean ridge OR a bowling ball type storm whose energy would come from the Pacific ocean entering the western US at a certain latitude and exiting the eastern US towards the Atlantic ocean at a more or less similar latitude. This second scenario, could end up being morphed into a clipper like system entering the US from the SW Canada region; Therefore, in other words, one scenario could lead to a more amplified storm and track, with some degree of blocking, whereas the other scenario, could allow for a progressive flow over the CONUS resulting in a less amplified storm track. In both cases, either GOMEX or Atlantic ocean moisture may aid in juicing up the storm. As the days go by, eventualy, we will favor one over the other as the noise and fog clears. Below, one can see the two possible scenarios outlined for this thread´s time frame. Scenario 1: Scenario 2: Teleconnections arguing for either scenario 1 or 2: ECMWF Deterministic: AO; suggesting possible availability of cold air. EPS telleconnections: AO suggesting availability of cold air. EPO suggesting pacific air presence; perhaps arguing for scenario 2. BSR support - shy and foggy: 500mb: Somewhat amplified. BSR surface, somewhat amplified, still possibly conveying a more progresive track.May be arguing for scenario 2. EPS Control Ensemble Control MSLP: This specific outcome argues for scenario 1. All in all looks pretty interesting and at least, a fun attempt at finding a storm to track that could yet make itself apparent on models in a more convincing fashion. So, pick your scenario and discuss.
×